What is the difference between utilitarianism and deontology?

Asked By: Lizeth Dworak | Last Updated: 4th June, 2020
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Deontological ethics is an ethics system that judges whether an action is right or wrong based on a moral code. Consequences of those actions are not taken into consideration. In the other hand, utilitarian ethics state that a course of action should be taken by considering the most positive outcome.

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Thereof, how do utilitarianism and deontology differ?

Utilitarianism and deontology are two known ethical systems. Utilitarianism revolves around the concept of “the end justifies the means,” while deontology works on the concept “the end does not justify the means.” 3. Utilitarianism is considered a consequence-oriented philosophy.

Furthermore, what do utilitarianism and Kantian deontology have in common? The primary difference between Kant's deontology (the fancy name for his ethical theory) and utilitarianism, is that Kant viewed an action as right or wrong without respect to the consequences, whereas utilitarianism views an action as right or wrong only with reference to the consequences of the action.

In this manner, what is the main idea of deontology?

In moral philosophy, deontological ethics or deontology (from Greek δέον, deon, "obligation, duty") is the normative ethical theory that the morality of an action should be based on whether that action itself is right or wrong under a series of rules, rather than based on the consequences of the action.

What is an example of utilitarianism?

Classical Utilitarianism Being “bad” only increases the number of people in the world who are suffering. An example of utilitarianism that shows someone making an individual “good” choice that actually benefits the entire population can be seen in Bobby's decision to buy his sister, Sally, a car.

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What is the opposite of utilitarianism?

Deontology is the opposite of utilitarianism.

What is an example of deontological ethics?

Deontology is defined as an ethical theory that the morality of an action should be based on whether that action itself is right or wrong under a series of rules, rather than based on the consequences of the action. An example of deontology is the belief that killing someone is wrong, even if it was in self-defense.

Is deontology the opposite of utilitarianism?

Deontological ethics is an ethics system that judges whether an action is right or wrong based on a moral code. Consequences of those actions are not taken into consideration. In the other hand, utilitarian ethics state that a course of action should be taken by considering the most positive outcome.

Why is deontology good?


In deontological ethics an action is considered morally good because of some characteristic of the action itself, not because the product of the action is good. Deontological ethics holds that at least some acts are morally obligatory regardless of their consequences for human welfare.

Which ethical theory is best?

Utilitarianism is an ethical theory that determines right from wrong by focusing on outcomes. It is a form of consequentialism. Utilitarianism holds that the most ethical choice is the one that will produce the greatest good for the greatest number.

Is Utilitarianism a deontological theory?

In Greek, telos means 'goal' or 'aim. ' In deontological theories, (moral) right is derived without a theory of (non-moral) good, or what choice is (morally) right regardless of the end consequences. In Greek, deon means 'duty. ' Utilitarian theories are teleological.

What are the rules of deontology?

Deontology is a theory that suggests actions are good or bad according to a clear set of rules. Its name comes from the Greek word deon, meaning duty. Actions that obey these rules are ethical, while actions that do not, are not. This ethical theory is most closely associated with German philosopher, Immanuel Kant.

What is teleological theory?


Teleological ethics, (teleological from Greek telos, “end”; logos, “science”), theory of morality that derives duty or moral obligation from what is good or desirable as an end to be achieved.

What is consequentialist ethics?

Consequentialism is the class of normative ethical theories holding that the consequences of one's conduct are the ultimate basis for any judgment about the rightness or wrongness of that conduct. Consequentialist theories differ in how they define moral goods.

What is duty to Kant?

Duty, Kant, and Deontology. To Kant, all humans must be seen as inherently worthy of respect and dignity. He argued that all morality must stem from such duties: a duty based on a deontological ethic. Consequences such as pain or pleasure are irrelevant.

What is Kantian theory?

Kantian ethics refers to a deontological ethical theory ascribed to the German philosopher Immanuel Kant. Central to Kant's construction of the moral law is the categorical imperative, which acts on all people, regardless of their interests or desires. Kant formulated the categorical imperative in various ways.

What are ethical duties?

Ethical Responsibility. Definition: Ethical responsibility is the ability to recognize, interpret and act upon multiple principles and values according to the standards within a given field and/or context.

Who came up with natural law?


The concept of natural law was documented in ancient Greek philosophy, including Aristotle, and was referred to in Roman philosophy by Cicero.

Is Christianity deontological?

At its simplest level, Christian ethics holds that one has a duty (moral, religious) to love one's neighbor. More pointedly, one is always to love the neighbor. Thus, neighbor-love is perfect, lending itself to an especially demanding characterization of deontology.

What is deontology in healthcare?

In contrast to the utilitarian concept, deontology is ethics of duty where the morality of an action depends on the nature of the action, i.e., harm is unacceptable irrespective of its consequences. This concept was introduced by a philosopher, Immanuel Kant and hence widely referred as Kantian deontology.