What does Tetrarch mean in the Bible?

Asked By: Earle Zerah | Last Updated: 26th April, 2020
Category: religion and spirituality christianity
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Definition of tetrarch. 1 : a governor of the fourth part of a province. 2 : a subordinate prince.

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Furthermore, what does Herod the Tetrarch mean?

ρ?δης ?ντίπατρος, Hērǭdēs Antipatros; born before 20 BC – died after 39 AD), known by the nickname Antipas, was a 1st-century ruler of Galilee and Perea, who bore the title of tetrarch ("ruler of a quarter") and is referred to as both "Herod the Tetrarch" and "King Herod" in the New Testament,

Similarly, what does Herod mean? From the Greek name 'Ηρωιδης (Heroides), which probably means "song of the hero" from 'ηρως (heros) meaning "hero, warrior" combined with ωιδη (oide) meaning "song, ode". This was the name of several rulers of Judea during the period when it was part of the Roman Empire.

Consequently, what does Tetrarchy mean?

The term Tetrarchy describes any form of government where power is divided among four individuals, but in modern usage usually refers to the system instituted by Roman Emperor Diocletian in 293, marking the end of the Crisis of the Third Century and the recovery of the Roman Empire.

What does the four Tetrarchs represent?

That represents the tetrarchy, the four co-rulers of the Roman empire since Diocletian. Two of them were senior emperors of the west and east (Augusti), and the other two their junior colleagues and future heirs to their seats (Caesares). The tetrarchy represented a new form of Roman imperial dominance.

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Who were the four Tetrarchs in Jesus time?

The Herodian Tetrarchy was formed following the death of Herod the Great in 4 BCE, when his kingdom was divided between his sons Herod Archelaus as ethnarch, Herod Antipas and Philip as tetrarchs in inheritance, while Herod's sister Salome I shortly ruled a toparchy of Jamnia.

Who was king when Jesus died?

Pontius Pilate served as the prefect of Judaea from 26 to 36 A.D. He convicted Jesus of treason and declared that Jesus thought himself King of the Jews, and had Jesus crucified. Pilate died 39 A.D. The cause of his death remains a mystery.

Who were the Herods in the Bible?

Herod Antipas, (born 21 bc—died ad 39), son of Herod I the Great who became tetrarch of Galilee and ruled throughout Jesus of Nazareth's ministry. In The Gospel According to Luke (13:32), Jesus is reported as having referred to him with contempt as “that fox.”

Who replaced archelaus?

4 BC to 6 AD). Archelaus was removed by Roman Emperor Augustus when Judaea province was formed under direct Roman rule, at the time of the Census of Quirinius. He was the son of Herod the Great and Malthace the Samaritan, and was the brother of Herod Antipas, and the half-brother of Herod II.

Why did John the Baptist condemn Herod's marriage?

According to the Gospels of Mark (6:14–29) and Matthew (14:1–12), Herod Antipas had imprisoned John the Baptist for condemning his marriage to Herodias, the divorced wife of his half brother Herod Philip (the marriage violated Mosaic Law), but Herod was afraid to have the popular prophet killed.

How is Constantine?

He became the Western emperor in 312 and the sole Roman emperor in 324. Constantine was also the first emperor to adhere to Christianity. He issued an edict that protected Christians in the empire and converted to Christianity on his deathbed in 337.

What is the meaning of Tetrarch in the Bible?

Definition of tetrarch. 1 : a governor of the fourth part of a province. 2 : a subordinate prince.

Why did the Roman Empire fall?

Invasions by Barbarian tribes
The most straightforward theory for Western Rome's collapse pins the fall on a string of military losses sustained against outside forces. Rome had tangled with Germanic tribes for centuries, but by the 300s “barbarian” groups like the Goths had encroached beyond the Empire's borders.

When did the Roman Empire fall?


In 476 C.E. Romulus, the last of the Roman emperors in the west, was overthrown by the Germanic leader Odoacer, who became the first Barbarian to rule in Rome. The order that the Roman Empire had brought to western Europe for 1000 years was no more.

What religion did Constantine follow?

Constantine is said to have written to Shapur II in 324 and urged him to protect Christians under his rule. With the establishment of Christianity as the state religion of the Roman Empire, Christians in Persia would be regarded as allies of Persia's ancient enemy.

What did the Edict of Milan do?

Edict of Milan, proclamation that permanently established religious toleration for Christianity within the Roman Empire. It was the outcome of a political agreement concluded in Mediolanum (modern Milan) between the Roman emperors Constantine I and Licinius in February 313.

What was a Roman Tetrarch?


Tetrarch. Tetrarch, (Greek: “ruler of a quarter”) in Greco-Roman antiquity, the ruler of a principality; originally the ruler of one-quarter of a region or province.

Where is Judea today?

The phrase is still used today by various figures who support Israeli annexation of the area. The name Judea, when used in Judea and Samaria, refers to all of the region south of Jerusalem, including Gush Etzion and Har Hebron. The region of Samaria, on the other hand, refers to the area north of Jerusalem.

Is Herod a name or a title?

Herod was granted the title of "King of Judea" by the Roman Senate. As such, he was a vassal of the Roman Empire, expected to support the interests of his Roman patrons.