Is it possible for a Type O woman to have a Type A child?

Asked By: Basit Cabos | Last Updated: 17th June, 2020
Category: science genetics
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A mother who is blood type O can only pass an O allele to her son or daughter. A father who is blood type AB could pass either an A or a B allele to his son or daughter. This couple could have children of either blood type A (O from mother and A from father) or blood type B (O from mother and B from father).

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In this regard, can parents with type O blood have a child with Type A?

Two O parents will get an O child nearly all of the time. But it is technically possible for two O-type parents to have a child with A or B blood, and maybe even AB (although this is really unlikely). In fact, a child can get almost any kind of blood type if you consider the effect of mutations.

Subsequently, question is, can certain blood types not have babies? If a baby's and mother's blood are incompatible, it can lead to fetal anemia, immune hydrops (erythroblastosis fetalis) and other complications. The most common type of blood type incompatibility is Rh disease (also known as Rh incompatibility). The Rh factor is a protein on the covering of red blood cells.

Consequently, can an AB mother have an O child?

To be O, you usually need to get an O from both mom and dad. But an AB parent usually has an A and a B version, not an O. So they usually can't have an O child.

Which blood types are not compatible for pregnancy?

Blood types are categorized by A, B, and O, and given an Rh factor of positive or negative. A-B-0 and Rh incompatibility happens when a mother's blood type conflicts with that of her newborn child. It is possible for a mother's red blood cells to cross into the placenta or fetus during pregnancy.

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Does a child always have their father's blood type?

No it doesn't. Neither of your parents has to have the same blood type as you. For example if one of your parents was AB+ and the other was O+, they could only have A and B kids. In other words, most likely none of their kids would share either parent's blood type.

Do twins have the same blood type?

Identical twins will always have the same blood type because they were created from the same fertilized egg (fraternal twins can have different blood types — again, providing the parents do — because they are created by two fertilized eggs).

What's the rarest blood type?

What's the Rarest Blood Type? In general, the rarest blood type is AB-negative and the most common is O-positive. Here's a breakdown of the most rare and common blood types by ethnicity, according to the American Red Cross.

How does a child get Type O blood?

Each biological parent donates one of their two ABO alleles to their child. A mother who is blood type O can only pass an O allele to her son or daughter. A father who is blood type AB could pass either an A or a B allele to his son or daughter.

Which parent determines blood type?


Just like eye or hair color, our blood type is inherited from our parents. Each biological parent donates one of two ABO genes to their child. The A and B genes are dominant and the O gene is recessive. For example, if an O gene is paired with an A gene, the blood type will be A.

What is the golden blood type?

One of the rarest blood types in the world is Rhnull, sometimes referred to as 'golden blood'. People with this blood type have a complete absence of any of the Rh antigens.

What is the genotype for type O blood?

A person with blood type B could have the genotype BB or BO. A person with blood type AB as the genotype AB. And a person with blood type O has the genotype OO.

Can a child have negative blood type if both parents are positive?

Yes, Mom or Dad may be positive, but that recessive negative gene is still floating around in his or her DNA. If it becomes paired with another negative gene from a similar positive-negative parent, that child will be negative even though both parents are positive.

Can O positive and O negative have a baby?

What happened was that dad and mom each passed both an O and an Rh negative to the baby. The end result is an O negative child. Each of their kids has around a 1 in 8 chance of having O negative blood. This is possible because both O and Rh- are something called recessive traits.

Can AB mother and O father have ab child?


Each biological parent donates one of their two ABO alleles to their child. A father who is blood type AB could pass either an A or a B allele to his son or daughter. This couple could have children of either blood type A (O from mother and A from father) or blood type B (O from mother and B from father).

What is the best blood type?

There are four principle types: A which is for Agrarian, B for Bavarian, O for Original hunter, and AB is the most modern blood type and has the best immune system.

How do you know your genotype?

Genotype is determined by the makeup of alleles, pairs of genes responsible for particular traits. An allele can be made up of two dominant genes, a dominant and a recessive gene, or two recessive genes. The combination of the two, and which one is dominant, determines what trait the allele will express.

Can a man with O blood type be the father of an AB child?

In cases of questioned paternity, ABO blood-typing can be used to exclude a man from being a child's father. For example, a man who has type AB blood could not father a child with type O blood, because he would pass on either the A or the B allele to all of his offspring.

What percent of fathers are not the real father?


Most paternity test labs report that about 1/3 of their paternity tests have a 'negative' result. Of all the possible fathers who take a paternity test, about 32% are not the biological father. But remember, this is 1/3 of men who have a reason to take a paternity test - not 1/3 of all men.

How many types of genotype do we have?

Answer and Explanation: There are three types of genotypes: homozygous dominant, homozygous recessive, and hetrozygous.

Can blood type change?

Almost always, an individual has the same blood group for life, but very rarely an individual's blood type changes through addition or suppression of an antigen in infection, malignancy, or autoimmune disease. Another more common cause of blood type change is a bone marrow transplant.