Which is the most common form of exposure to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace?

Asked By: Manon Stuttgen | Last Updated: 14th January, 2020
Category: medical health infectious diseases
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The three bloodborne pathogens that are the most commonly involved in occupational exposures in healthcare workers are hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV (Weber, Rutala, Eron, 2013; Deuffic-Burbank, Delaroccque-Astagneau, Abitedoul, 2011).

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Beside this, what is the most common form of exposure for healthcare workers?

The most common type of exposure was the needlestick injury (77.6%). 27.9% of the accidents occurred during the blood sampling and 23.5% during the surgical procedure.

Subsequently, question is, which could cause you to be exposed to a bloodborne pathogen? Bloodborne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries may expose workers to bloodborne pathogens.

Also asked, what are four main ways that you can become infected with a bloodborne pathogen?

Bloodborne pathogens such as HBV and HIV can be transmitted through contact with infected human blood and other potentially infectious body fluids such as:

  • semen.
  • vaginal secretions.
  • cerebrospinal fluid.
  • synovial fluid.
  • pleural fluid.
  • peritoneal fluid.
  • amniotic fluid.
  • saliva (in dental procedures), and.

Are there only 3 bloodborne pathogens?

Bloodborne pathogens and workplace sharps injuries. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are three of the most common bloodborne pathogens from which health care workers are at risk.

27 Related Question Answers Found

What is the most common blood borne disease?

The most common bloodborne diseases are hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Is MRSA bloodborne?

Certain body fluids can contain bloodborne pathogens that infect humans and spread from person to person. The bloodborne pathogens of primary concern are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and MRSA.

What is the most common risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens for healthcare workers OSHA?

The three bloodborne pathogens that are the most commonly involved in occupational exposures in healthcare workers are hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV (Weber, Rutala, Eron, 2013; Deuffic-Burbank, Delaroccque-Astagneau, Abitedoul, 2011).

How do you prevent the disease in bloodborne?

Work Practices to Prevent Infection
Protect yourself by following these steps: Treat all blood and body fluid spills as if they were infectious. When providing first aid or CPR, protect yourself first, then treat the victim second. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment: gloves, goggles, etc.

What is the most common transmission mode for blood borne infections?


Bloodborne pathogens are most commonly transmitted through:
Accidental puncture from contaminated needles, broken glass, or other sharps. Contact between broken or damaged skin and infected body fluids. Contact between mucous membranes and infected body fluids.

Can Bloodborne Pathogens be spread from an object to a person?

Bloodborne Pathogens can be transmitted when blood or body fluid from an infected person enters another person's body via needle-sticks, human bites, cuts, abrasions, or through mucous membranes. Also, semen, vaginal secretions and saliva in dental procedures are considered potentially infected body fluids.

How long can bloodborne pathogens live?

It is. This is because certain bloodborne viruses can live for days outside the body and still cause infection. Hepatitis B virus can live in dried blood for up to a week. Hepatitis C virus can survive for up to four days.

Are Bloodborne Pathogens Airborne?

"Bloodborne Pathogens" are pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. Pathogens, such as the influenza virus, travel through the air and are considered airborne pathogens.

How can employees become infected by bloodborne pathogens in the workplace?

Bloodborne pathogens can be transmitted through: Accidental punctures and cuts with contaminated sharp materials (e.g. Needle stick). Contact between mucous membranes or broken skin and infected body fluids (e.g. Splash).

What materials could be potentially infected with bloodborne pathogens assuming they are not mixed with human blood?


Other body fluids that can contain these pathogens even if no blood is visible (OPIM) include spinal fluid, joint fluid, amniotic fluid (the water from childbirth) semen, vaginal secretions and the small amount of fluid that surrounds the heart, lungs and intestines.

How do you get rid of bloodborne pathogens?

Proper bloodborne pathogen cleanup involves specialized disposal procedures. Placing soiled items in doubled disposable red bags with “Biohazard” clearly marked, and giving them to a licensed infectious waste removal company, are two ways to protect the area and people from bloodborne pathogens. Never use bleach!

Can Bloodborne Pathogens be spread through casual contact?

Unlike some infectious diseases, bloodborne pathogens are not spread by casual contact such as handshakes, hugging, doorknobs, or use of the same equipment like toilets or water fountains. Bloodborne Pathogen – A bloodborne pathogen is a microorganism that's present in human blood and can cause disease in humans.

What is the protocol if you are exposed to bloodborne pathogens?

Wash exposed skin, cuts, and needlestick injuries thoroughly with soap and water. If you have been splashed by potentially infectious fluids around the eyes, nose or mouth, flush the area with water. Immediately report the incident to emergency medical services.

What are 4 methods of compliance to bloodborne pathogens standards?

Universal Precautions; Engineering and work practice controls, e.g., safer medical devices, sharps disposal containers, hand hygiene; Personal protective equipment; Housekeeping, including decontamination procedures and removal of regulated waste.

Who is at risk for bloodborne pathogens?


All health workers – including waste disposal workers, and emergency and safety workers exposed to the risk of bloodborne pathogens – are at risk of exposure. They should be immunized either before training or as soon as possible when at work, unless they are already immunized (15).

Which route of bloodborne pathogen exposure is the most common in the healthcare setting?

In the health care setting, blood-borne pathogen transmission occurs predominantly by percutaneous or mucosal exposure of workers to the blood or body fluids of infected patients.

What precautions can you take to prevent contact with bloodborne pathogens?

The Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030) and CDC's recommended standard precautions both include personal protective equipment, such as gloves, gowns, masks, eye protection (e.g., goggles), and face shields, to protect workers from exposure to infectious diseases.