What other cellular structures organelles can produce ATP?

Asked By: Doncho Hochdorffer | Last Updated: 8th February, 2020
Category: science genetics
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Most eukaryotic cells contain many mitochondria, which occupy up to 25 percent of the volume of the cytoplasm. These complex organelles, the main sites of ATP production during aerobic metabolism, are among the largest organelles, generally exceeded in size only by the nucleus, vacuoles, and chloroplasts.

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Also know, in what cellular organelle is most ATP produced?

mitochondria

Furthermore, what are the cellular organelles? Cell organelles. Every cell in your body contains organelles (structures that have specific functions). Just like organs in the body, each organelle contributes in its own way to helping the cell function well as a whole. The nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts are all organelles.

Also question is, what cell structures use sugar for ATP?

Mitochondria are known as the powerhouses of the cell. They are organelles that act like a digestive system which takes in nutrients, breaks them down, and creates energy rich molecules for the cell. In cellular respiration sugar with the help of oxygen is broken down into ATP (energy molecule).

Where is ATP made in cell?

Most of the ATP in cells is produced by the enzyme ATP synthase, which converts ADP and phosphate to ATP. ATP synthase is located in the membrane of cellular structures called mitochondria; in plant cells, the enzyme also is found in chloroplasts.

28 Related Question Answers Found

What are the three functions of mitochondria?

The most prominent roles of mitochondria are to produce the energy currency of the cell, ATP (i.e., phosphorylation of ADP), through respiration, and to regulate cellular metabolism. The central set of reactions involved in ATP production are collectively known as the citric acid cycle, or the Krebs cycle.

What is ATP used for?

The Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule is the nucleotide known in biochemistry as the "molecular currency" of intracellular energy transfer; that is, ATP is able to store and transport chemical energy within cells. ATP also plays an important role in the synthesis of nucleic acids.

How big is a mitochondria?

The size and shape of mitochondria, like the number in a cell, vary from one tissue to another and with the physiological state of the cells. Most mitochondria are ovoid bodies having a diameter between 0.5 and 1.0 µm and a length up to 7 µm.

How is ATP generated?

The actual formation of ATP molecules requires a complex process called chemiosmosis. This energy is used by enzymes to unite ADP with phosphate ions to form ATP. The energy is trapped in the high-energy bond of ATP by this process, and the ATP molecules are made available to perform cell work.

How many organelles are in a eukaryotic cell?

Like a prokaryotic cell, a eukaryotic cell has a plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and ribosomes. However, unlike prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells have: a membrane-bound nucleus. numerous membrane-bound organelles (including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, chloroplasts, and mitochondria)

What is the structure and function of mitochondria?

Mitochondria - Turning on the Powerhouse
Mitochondria are known as the powerhouses of the cell. They are organelles that act like a digestive system which takes in nutrients, breaks them down, and creates energy rich molecules for the cell. The biochemical processes of the cell are known as cellular respiration.

How does ATP cross the membrane?

Under normal conditions, ATP and ADP cannot cross the inner mitochondrial membrane due to their high negative charges, but ADP/ATP translocase, an antiporter, couples the transport of the two molecules. The depression in ADP/ATP translocase alternatively faces the matrix and the cytoplasmic sides of the membrane.

How is food converted to ATP?

Summary. Through the process of cellular respiration, the energy in food is converted into energy that can be used by the body's cells. During cellular respiration, glucose and oxygen are converted into carbon dioxide and water, and the energy is transferred to ATP.

What is ATP cycle?

The process of phosphorylating ADP to form ATP and removing a phosphate from ATP to form ADP in order to store and release energy respectively is known as the ATP cycle. Adenosine triphosphate is an energy source that is used in living things. ATP is created during cellular respiration.

Is ATP a protein?

ATP - Nature's Energy Store
proteins and DNA, and the transport of molecules and ions throughout the organism.

Is ATP a nucleic acid?

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a nucleic acid molecule that remains a single nucleotide. Unlike a DNA or RNA nucleotide, the ATP nucleotide has three phosphate groups attached to its ribose sugar.

Do chloroplasts produce ATP?

Chloroplasts capture the energy in sunlight and use it to synthesize energy-rich carbohydrates. This food made by chloroplasts provides the chemical energy needed by all forms of life. Both mitochondria and chloroplasts are sites of production of ATP, the energy currency of the cell.

How is ATP broken down?

It is called the pyrophosphate bond. In order to release it's energy to the body, ATP breaks down into ADP [Adenosine Diphosphate(2 phosphates)] and an inorganic phosphate group and releases energy from the pyrophosphate bond. To once again become ATP, ADP gets energy and its third phosphate from respiration.

What cells have a mitochondria?

Mitochondrion, membrane-bound organelle found in the cytoplasm of almost all eukaryotic cells (cells with clearly defined nuclei), the primary function of which is to generate large quantities of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

How is ATP produced in the mitochondria?

Mitochondria, using oxygen available within the cell convert chemical energy from food in the cell to energy in a form usable to the host cell. NADH is then used by enzymes embedded in the mitochondrial inner membrane to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP). In ATP the energy is stored in the form of chemical bonds.

What are 2 types of organelles?

Different Organelles and their Functions
  • Plasma Membrane.
  • Nucleus/DNA.
  • Ribosome.
  • Mitochondria.
  • Vacuoles.
  • Cytoskeleton.
  • Plastids.
  • Endoplasmic Reticulum.