What is the narrator's name in St Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves?

Asked By: Nicoleta Fenichel | Last Updated: 1st February, 2020
Category: family and relationships parenting children aged 4 11
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In “St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves”, the girls are forced to learn the human language since they only know how to speak “the Wolf”. The narrator, whose English name is Claudette, describes how “we [the girls] were all uncomfortable and between languages.” (Russell 229).

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Similarly one may ask, who is the narrator in St Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves?

Claudette

Secondly, what genre is St Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves? Fiction Anthology

Moreover, who is the main character in St Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves?

Claudette

How is St Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves an allegory?

Lucy's is a home for girls that is run by nuns, it is allegorical to Native boarding schools that were run with Christian beliefs being very prominent. This is similar to this story because the nuns taught the girls to prefer the human way of living, while also conditioning them to look down upon their own culture.

7 Related Question Answers Found

Why does the pack start to hate Jeanette?

They hated Jeanette for how easily she threw away her wolf attributes and become a sheep, and they hated Mirabella because she did not put an effort to change at all. The pack feared to be shunned by both of their species so they decided to put an effort to become a sheep.

What is Lycanthropic culture shock?

My definition for “lycanthropic culture shock” is when someone who imagines him, or herself, to be a wolf experiences feelings of confusion, doubt or isolation when brought into sudden contact with human culture. When the girls arrive at St. Lucy's, they look and act like animals.

What effect does Jeanette's naming have on the pack?

What effect does Jeanette's naming have on the pack? ? Jeanette's naming frightens the pack, as they begin to run “in a loose, uncertain circle.” They feel as if they should help Jeanette, but are also overcome by their “new fear” (p. 228). The pack feels a “subtler danger afoot, written in a language (p.