What is the meaning of God's grandeur?

Asked By: Heura Mogele | Last Updated: 8th March, 2020
Category: books and literature poetry
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The word "grandeur" means grandness or magnificence. In "God's Grandeur" Hopkins conveys his reverence for the magnificence of God and nature, and his despair about the way that humanity has seemed to lose sight of the close connection between God and nature during the Second Industrial Revolution.

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Then, what is the main idea of the poem God grandeur?

The central idea of this poem is that the "grandeur of God" is so fundamentally a part of the world, which he created and "charged with" his power and beauty, that it can never entirely be "spent." It can appear, at times, that after generations of men have "trod" and "toiled" through the soil and earth God laid down,

Furthermore, what type of sonnet is God's grandeur? Italian Sonnet

Beside this, how does God's grandeur fill this world?

In this sonnet, Hopkins praises the magnificence and glory of God in the world, blending accurate observation with lofty imagination. The world is filled with the greatness of God. God's glory expresses itself in two ways. Sometimes it flames out with sudden brightness when a gold foil is shaken.

What is the meaning of trod?

verb. Trod is the past tense of tread, which is defined as to step on, over or to float in water. An example of trod is someone having stepped over a small creek.

26 Related Question Answers Found

What is the central idea of this poem?

The central idea of a poem is the poem's theme or 'what it's about' if you like. Although many shy away from poems being 'about' something, at the end of the day, the poet had something in mind when it was written, and that something is the central idea, whatever it is or might have been.

What do the word seared Bleared smeared suggest?

"Seared" suggests injury. "Smeared" and "bleared" suggest dirt or defilement. All three words imply that something naturally beautiful has been damaged, and a sense of perception compromised. These words are the explanation for why people cannot see the grandeur of God.

How does Hopkins celebrate God's grandeur?

In "God's Grandeur" Hopkins conveys his reverence for the magnificence of God and nature, and his despair about the way that humanity has seemed to lose sight of the close connection between God and nature during the Second Industrial Revolution.

What is the central idea of the poem the school boy?

"The School Boy" is a poem written in the pastoral tradition that focuses on the downsides of formal learning. It considers how going to school on a summer day "drives all joy away". The boy in this poem is more interested in escaping his classroom than he is with anything his teacher is trying to teach.

Why men are unaware of the greatness of God?


The world is filled with the greatness of God. Men are born and die and are unaware of God's greatness. Because they are too concerned with work, men cannot understand the greatness of God.

What is the significance of the repetition of the words have trod in the poem?

The repetition of the words 'have trod' highlights the commercial accounts of human generations following worldly pleasure. Our human generations are marching on from centuries to centuries continually and rearing, blearing and smearing the world.

What is the central idea of the poem The Road Not Taken?

The main idea of the poem is that the speaker is confronted with this fork in the road and must make a choice as to which road to take. The speaker can only choose one path, and must abide by that choice. The theme of the poem is that human beings are defined by the choices they face and the choices they make.

What does the poet say in the first quatrain and in the second?

Answer: In the first four lines the poet praises the magnificence and glory of god. In the second quatrian, the poet gives the reason behind man's ignorance, indifference and heedlessness ( ??????? ) at the full-flowing presence of God. He says that it is because human world is infected with materialistic thinking.

What is the poem God's grandeur about?

God's Grandeur is a finely crafted sonnet written in 1877, the year Hopkins was ordained as a Jesuit priest. It explores the relationship between God and the world of nature, how the divine is infused in things and refreshes, despite the efforts of humans to ruin the whole show.

What is the theme of God's grandeur?


Life, Consciousness, and Existence. Among other things, "God's Grandeur" proposes that the meaning of life and the purpose of human existence can be discovered through nature. As an expression both of intense anxiety and of intense joy, this poem can seem to be on the serious side.

Why does Hopkins feel that the earth is charged with God's grandeur?

Inscape describes the uniqueness of all things, while instress is the presence of God in that uniqueness. Again, Hopkins asserts that "the world is charged with the grandeur of God," which allows (in a parallel to the Resurrection) for the earth to be continually renewed (1).

What is the meaning of Pied Beauty?

Pied Beauty is a reduced form of the sonnet, known as a curtal sonnet, and is one of many poems written by Hopkins that gives praise to God's natural omnipotence. The poem focuses on things in nature that have distinct patterning and unusual design and compares and contrasts differences or similarities.

What is the rhyme scheme of a Petrarchan sonnet?

noun. a sonnet form popularized by Petrarch, consisting of an octave with the rhyme scheme abbaabba and of a sestet with one of several rhyme schemes, as cdecde or cdcdcd.

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day by William Shakespeare?


Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Sonnet 18 is one of the best-known of the 154 sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare. In the sonnet, the speaker asks whether he should compare the young man to a summer's day, but notes that the young man has qualities that surpass a summer's day.

What does Sassiness mean?

adjective, sas·si·er, sas·si·est. Informal. impertinent; insolent; saucy: a sassy reply; a sassy teen. pert; boldly smart; saucy: a sassy red handbag.