What is the difference between Codominance and complete dominance?

Asked By: Essa Jindra | Last Updated: 26th January, 2020
Category: science genetics
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In complete dominance, only one allele in the genotype is seen in the phenotype. In codominance, both alleles in the genotype are seen in the phenotype. In incomplete dominance, a mixture of the alleles in the genotype is seen in the phenotype.

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Considering this, what is the difference between dominance and Codominance?

In both codominance and incomplete dominance, both alleles for a trait are dominant. In codominance a heterozygous individual expresses both simultaneously without any blending. In incomplete dominance a heterozygous individual blends the two traits.

One may also ask, what is the difference between incomplete dominance and Codominance give an example of each? Incomplete dominance is when the phenotypes of the two parents blend together to create a new phenotype for their offspring. An example is a white flower and a red flower producing pink flowers. Codominance is when the two parent phenotypes are expressed together in the offspring.

Likewise, people ask, what is complete dominance?

Complete dominance is a form of dominance in heterozygous condition wherein the allele that is regarded as dominant completely masks the effect of the allele that is recessive. For instance, an individual carrying two alleles that are both dominant (e.g. AA), the trait that they represent will be expressed.

What is the difference between incomplete dominance and Codominance quizlet?

incomplete dominance= neither allele is dominant but are expressed. codominance= neither allele is dominant, but expression of alleles is observed as a distinct phenotype in heterozygous individual. inheritance of 1 character has no effect on inheritance of others.

37 Related Question Answers Found

What is an example of Codominance?

When two alleles for a trait are equally expressed with neither being recessive or dominant, it creates codominance. Examples of codominance include a person with type AB blood, which means that both the A allele and the B allele are equally expressed.

How do you determine Codominance?

Codominance is when both alleles in the genotype are seen in the phenotype, like a flower that is half blue and half red. Incomplete dominance is a mixture of the alleles, like for example, a mixture of blue and red flower, a purple flower.

Why does Codominance happen?

Codominance occurs when both alleles show dominance, as in the case of the AB blood type (IA IB) in humans. Furthermore, the human ABO blood groups represent another deviation from Mendelian simplicity since there are more than two alleles (A, B, and O) for this particular trait.

What is the law of incomplete dominance?

Incomplete dominance is a form of intermediate inheritance in which one allele for a specific trait is not completely expressed over its paired allele. This results in a third phenotype in which the expressed physical trait is a combination of the phenotypes of both alleles.

How do you show incomplete dominance?


A Punnett square for a cross between two heterozygous snapdragons will predict the genotypes RR, Rr, and rr in a 1:2:1 ratio, and since these alleles display incomplete dominance, the phenotypes will be red, pink and white in a 1:2:1 ratio.

What are examples of multiple alleles?

Examples of Multiple Alleles
Two human examples of multiple-allele genes are the gene of the ABO blood group system, and the human-leukocyte-associated antigen (HLA) genes. The ABO system in humans is controlled by three alleles, usually referred to as IA, IB, and IO (the "I" stands for isohaemagglutinin).

Which is an example of incomplete dominance?

When one parent with straight hair and one with curly hair have a child with wavy hair, that's an example of incomplete dominance. Eye color is often cited as an example of incomplete dominance.

What is complete dominance example?

The flowers on Mendel's pea plant are an example of complete dominance, or when the dominant allele completely covers up the recessive allele. In addition to complete dominance, scientists have found incomplete dominance, where there is a blending, and codominance, where both alleles show up.

What are the three types of dominance?

Terms in this set (10)
  • complete. allele is expressed in both homozygous dominant and heterozygous conditions.
  • incomplete. alleles exhibit a phenotype intermediate between those with homozygous alleles (blending)
  • codominance.
  • pleiotropy.
  • polygenic.
  • epistasis.
  • Morgan.
  • x-linked traits.

What is the ratio for Codominance?


Codominance. This is a type of dominance in which the heterozygote exhibits a phenotype that reflects both characters carried by the two alleles making up the heterozygous genotype. Therefore, the F2 progeny will consist of three distinct phenotypes with a ratio that is identical to the genotypic ratio, that is, 1:2:1.

Why does incomplete dominance occur?

Incomplete dominance can occur because neither of the two alleles is fully dominant over the other, or because the dominant allele does not fully dominate the recessive allele. This results in a phenotype that is different from both the dominant and recessive alleles, and appears to be a mixture of both.

Is complete dominance Mendelian?

Complete dominance
A classic example of dominance is the inheritance of seed shape (pea shape) in peas. Peas may be round (associated with allele R) or wrinkled (associated with allele r). In this case, three combinations of alleles (genotypes) are possible: RR and rr are homozygous and Rr is heterozygous.

How can you tell if someone is heterozygous or homozygous for a trait that is dominant?

To identify whether an organism exhibiting a dominant trait is homozygous or heterozygous for a specific allele, a scientist can perform a test cross. The organism in question is crossed with an organism that is homozygous for the recessive trait, and the offspring of the test cross are examined.

What makes a species dominant?

A dominant species is a plant, animal or functional group of different species most commonly or conspicuously found in a particular ecosystem. A dominant species might be better at obtaining resources, resisting diseases or deterring competitors or predators than other species.

What traits are polygenic?


Polygenic inheritance occurs when one characteristic is controlled by two or more genes. Often the genes are large in quantity but small in effect. Examples of human polygenic inheritance are height, skin color, eye color and weight. Polygenes exist in other organisms, as well.

What does it mean when an inheritance pattern shows complete dominance?

Complete dominance occurs when one allele – or “version” – of a gene completely masks another. The trait that is expressed is described as being “dominant” over the trait that is not expressed. Most organisms are diploid – that is, they get two copies of each gene, one from each of their parents.

What is a Dihybrid cross used for?

A dihybrid cross describes a mating experiment between two organisms that are identically hybrid for two traits. A hybrid organism is one that is heterozygous, which means that is carries two different alleles at a particular genetic position, or locus.