What is a protein pathway?

Asked By: Dian Luhder | Last Updated: 1st April, 2020
Category: science genetics
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Cell Biology 04: The Secretory Pathway. The secretory pathway refers to the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the vesicles that travel in between them as well as the cell membrane and lysosomes. It's named 'secretory' for being the pathway by which the cell secretes proteins into the extracellular environment.

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In respect to this, what is the path of protein synthesis?

Proteins destined to be secreted move through the secretory pathway in the following order: rough ER → ER-to-Golgi transport vesicles → Golgi cisternae → secretory or transport vesicles → cell surface (exocytosis) (see Figure 17-13). Small transport vesicles bud off from the ER and fuse to form the cis-Golgi reticulum.

Additionally, what does a receptor protein do? A receptor protein is meant to recognize and bind to specific substances outside of the cell. Once a receptor protein binds with a substance or what we will now call a chemical signal, it then sends a chemical messenger into the cell.

Hereof, how are proteins transported?

Most proteins are then transported to the Golgi apparatus in membrane vesicles. The protein with its final set of carbohydrate chains is then transported to the plasma membrane in a transport vesicle. The vesicle fuses with the plasma membrane, its lipids and protein cargo becoming part of the plasma membrane.

What is a gene pathway?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A biological pathway is a series of interactions among molecules in a cell that leads to a certain product or a change in a cell. Such a pathway can trigger the assembly of new molecules, such as a fat or protein. Pathways can also turn genes on and off, or spur a cell to move.

36 Related Question Answers Found

What are proteins made of?

Proteins are made up of smaller building blocks called amino acids, joined together in chains. There are 20 different amino acids. Some proteins are just a few amino acids long, while others are made up of several thousands. These chains of amino acids fold up in complex ways, giving each protein a unique 3D shape.

Do all cells need ribosomes?

All cells need proteins to live. Thus, all cells have ribosomes. While a structure such as a nucleus is only found in eukaryotes, every cell needs ribosomes to manufacture proteins. Since there are no membrane-bound organelles in prokaryotes, the ribosomes float free in the cytosol.

What is the purpose of transcription?

Describe the process and purpose of transcription. The purpose of transcription is to produce an mRNA copy of a gene, to allow the genetic information to pass out of the nucleus, through the nuclear pores where it can be used to assemble a protein.

How are proteins produced?

The information to produce a protein is encoded in the cell's DNA. When a protein is produced, a copy of the DNA is made (called mRNA) and this copy is transported to a ribosome. Ribosomes read the information in the mRNA and use that information to assemble amino acids into a protein.

How are ribosomes formed?


Eukaryote ribosomes are produced and assembled in the nucleolus. Ribosomal proteins enter the nucleolus and combine with the four rRNA strands to create the two ribosomal subunits (one small and one large) that will make up the completed ribosome (see Figure 1).

What is the process of transcription?

Transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is copied into a new molecule of messenger RNA (mRNA). DNA safely and stably stores genetic material in the nuclei of cells as a reference, or template.

What is the purpose of protein synthesis?

Protein synthesis is the process all cells use to make proteins, which are responsible for all cell structure and function. In transcription, DNA is copied to mRNA, which is used as a template for the instructions to make protein. In the second step, translation, the mRNA is read by a ribosome.

What is mRNA made of?

Messenger RNA (mRNA) Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to one of the DNA strands of a gene. The mRNA is an RNA version of the gene that leaves the cell nucleus and moves to the cytoplasm where proteins are made.

Where are proteins made?

Proteins are synthesized on ribosomes that read the mRNA and decode it to stringing together a defined series of amino acids. In animals, you find the ribosomes in the cytoplasm, although they can stick to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum if they are producing membrane-bound or export proteins.

What are two types of transport proteins?


Carrier proteins and channel proteins are the two major classes of membrane transport proteins. Carrier proteins (also called carriers, permeases, or transporters) bind the specific solute to be transported and undergo a series of conformational changes to transfer the bound solute across the membrane (Figure 11-3).

Where does protein sorting occur?

The first step of protein sorting takes place while translation is still in progress. Many proteins destined for the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, the plasma membrane, and secretion from the cell are synthesized on ribosomes that are bound to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum.

What part of the cell transports proteins?

Answer and Explanation: The organelle that transports proteins is called the endoplasmic reticulum, or ER.

Where are ribosomes found?

Ribosomes are found 'free' in the cytoplasm or bound to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to form rough ER. In a mammalian cell there can be as many as 10 million ribosomes. Several ribosomes can be attached to the same mRNA strand, this structure is called a polysome.

How are transmembrane proteins made?

This organelle contains the enzymes involved in lipid synthesis, and as lipids are manufactured in the ER, they are inserted into the organelle's own membranes. Similarly, transmembrane proteins have enough hydrophobic surfaces that they are also inserted into the ER membrane while they are still being synthesized.

Where does the endoplasmic reticulum transport proteins?

The endoplasmic reticulum serves many general functions, including the folding of protein molecules in sacs called cisternae and the transport of synthesized proteins in vesicles to the Golgi apparatus.

What happens to protein after translation?

Protein Folding
After being translated from mRNA, all proteins start out on a ribosome as a linear sequence of amino acids. Many proteins fold spontaneously, but some proteins require helper molecules, called chaperones, to prevent them from aggregating during the complicated process of folding.