What happened after the US Army forced the Cherokee from their homes in 1838?

Asked By: Casimiro Oelbracht | Last Updated: 21st March, 2020
Category: news and politics war and conflicts
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What happened after the US Army forced the Cherokee from their homes in 1838? The Cherokee were forcibly removed to Indian Territory. The Cherokee moved east and assimilated into white culture. The Cherokee willingly signed treaties giving up their lands.

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Thereof, what happened to the Cherokee after their forced removal to the Indian territory?

The removal, or forced emigration, of Cherokee Indians occurred in 1838, when the U.S. military and various state militias forced some 15,000 Cherokees from their homes in Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee and moved them west to Indian Territory (now present-day Oklahoma).

Also, how did the Indian Removal Act affect the Cherokees? Overview: In 1830 Congress, urged on by President Andrew Jackson, passed the Indian Removal Act which gave the federal government the power to relocate any Native Americans in the east to territory that was west of the Mississippi River.

Likewise, people ask, what kind of effect did the forced removal of the Cherokees from their land have on them?

The removal of the Cherokees was a product of the demand for arable land during the rampant growth of cotton agriculture in the Southeast, the discovery of gold on Cherokee land, and the racial prejudice that many white southerners harbored toward American Indians.

What was the result of the 1831 case Cherokee Nation v Georgia?

What was the result of the 1831 case Cherokee Nation v. The Supreme Court held that the Cherokee Nation had rights to gold on their lands. The Supreme Court held that Georgia could not take away Cherokee lands. The Supreme Court held that the Cherokee could not sue as a foreign nation.

39 Related Question Answers Found

Who benefited from the Indian Removal Act?

The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830, authorizing the president to grant unsettled lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy.

How much money do Cherokee get?

The Eastern Band of Cherokee isn't the only group whose members get unconditional cash: The Alaska Permanent Fund has been giving $1,000 to $2,000 a year to its citizens for decades, and other Native American tribes have also divided up casino revenues. But the Cherokee example is among the most researched.

Who can buy a house on an Indian reservation?

And no one can get a mortgage because the property on the reservation is held in trust by the federal government; most of it also is “owned” communally by the tribe. No bank could ever foreclose on a property, because the bank can't own reservation land.

What really happened on the Trail of Tears?

In 1838 and 1839, as part of Andrew Jackson's Indian removal policy, the Cherokee nation was forced to give up its lands east of the Mississippi River and to migrate to an area in present-day Oklahoma. The Cherokee people called this journey the "Trail of Tears," because of its devastating effects.

What did the Cherokees want to achieve?


The terms were simple: the Cherokees would receive $5 million for all their land east of the Mississippi. The government would help them move and promise never to take their new land or incorporate it into the United States. The Cherokees would have two years to leave.

How do I find out what Native American tribe I belong to?

Trace Indian Ancestry. To determine if you are eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe, contact the tribe, or tribes, you claim ancestry from. It is the individual tribes who set tribal enrollment requirements.

Who did America belong to first?

The arrival of Christopher Columbus in the year 1492 started the European colonization of the Americas. Most colonies were formed after 1600, and the early records and writings of John Winthrop make the United States the first nation whose most distant origins are fully recorded.

What happened after the Indian Removal Act?

The Indian Removal Act was signed into law on May 28, 1830, by United States President Andrew Jackson. The law authorized the president to negotiate with southern Native American tribes for their removal to federal territory west of the Mississippi River in exchange for white settlement of their ancestral lands.

How did the Treaty of 1819 affect the Cherokee?

The treaty proposed exchanging Cherokee lands in the Southeast for territory west of the Mississippi River. The government promised assistance in resettling those Cherokees who chose to remove, and approximately 1,500-2,000 did. In 1819 the remaining Cherokees who opposed removal negotiated still another treaty.

Why was the Cherokee forced to move?


The Cherokee Trail of Tears resulted from the enforcement of the Treaty of New Echota, an agreement signed under the provisions of the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which exchanged Indian land in the East for lands west of the Mississippi River, but which was never accepted by the elected tribal leadership or a majority

Why did the US government forced the Cherokee to move west?

With the Indian Removal Act of 1830, the U.S. Congress had given Jackson authority to negotiate removal treaties, exchanging Indian land in the East for land west of the Mississippi River. Jackson used the dispute with Georgia to put pressure on the Cherokee to sign a removal treaty.

Who forced the Cherokee to move?

By 1838, only about 2,000 Cherokees had left their Georgia homeland for Indian Territory. President Martin Van Buren sent General Winfield Scott and 7,000 soldiers to expedite the removal process. Scott and his troops forced the Cherokee into stockades at bayonet point while whites looted their homes and belongings.

Where is the Cherokee reservation in Oklahoma?

Headquartered in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, the Cherokee Nation has a tribal jurisdictional area spanning 14 counties in the northeastern corner of Oklahoma.

When did the Indian Removal Act end?


The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830, authorizing the president to grant unsettled lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy.

Are there any Cherokee tribes left?

Today, the Cherokee Nation is the largest tribe in the United States with more than 370,000 tribal citizens worldwide. More than 141,000 Cherokee Nation citizens reside within the 14-county tribal jurisdictional area that covers most of northeastern Oklahoma.

How much land did Native Americans take?

From the birth of our country to today, we seized 1.5 billion acres of native land.