What factors affect an author's viewpoint?

Asked By: Rossmery Riffi | Last Updated: 25th March, 2020
Category: books and literature fiction
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There are many factors that can affect an author's viewpoint, from the given options those factors are the author's knowledge , the author's opinion , the author's worldview and the author's experience .

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Thereof, what factors affect an author's viewpoint check all that apply?

There are many factors that can affect an author's viewpoint, from the given options those factors are the author's knowledge , the author's opinion , the author's worldview and the author's experience .

Additionally, what is the author's viewpoint in this excerpt the great wave? the author's viewpoint in this excerpt is: The Great Wave represents feelings of ambivalence in Japanese culture.

People also ask, how does geijer's comment support MacGregor's point?

It describes the way tea became popular in Great Britain. It illustrates the popularity of tea in Britain during the 1800s. It argues that tea is not originally from Great Britain.

What must students use when summarizing an informational text?

Answer Expert Verified. When summarizing informational text, briefly describe the text in your own words. Tell only the most important details and ideas, must be effective, and objective.

7 Related Question Answers Found

Which line is direct quotation from an external source?

Answer: The line that is a direct quotation from an external source is “The Japanese have a word for insular which is literally the mental state of the people living on islands:shimaguni konjo.”

How does geijer's comment support MacGregor's point it describes the way tea became popular in Great Britain it shows how many wars were started as?

The correct answer is It illustrates the popularity of tea in Britain during the 1800s. His comment is basically that it was so popular there that it became their national drink more or less. Everyone drinks it and in large amounts.

Which excerpt from early Victorian tea set best expresses MacGregor viewpoint about tea?

The excerpt, which expresses MacGregor's viewpoint about tea is this: “THE DRINK WHICH HAS BECOME THE WORLDWIDE CARICATURE OF BRITISHNESS HAS NOTHING INDIGENOUS ABOUT IT, BUT IS THE RESULT OF CENTURIES OF GLOBAL TRADE AND A COMPLEX IMPERIAL HISTORY.”