What does idiom mean in literature?

Asked By: Aneu Mitrofan | Last Updated: 27th January, 2020
Category: fine art theater
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Definition of Idiom. The term idiom refers to a set expression or a phrase comprising two or more words. An interesting fact regarding the device is that the expression is not interpreted literally. The phrase is understood to mean something quite different from what individual words of the phrase would imply.

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Also, what is an example of an idiom?

An idiom is a phrase or expression whose meaning can't be understood from the ordinary meanings of the words in it. For example, “Get off my back!” is an idiom meaning “Stop bothering me!” The idiom “You hit the nail on the head” means “You're exactly right.” Here are some other idioms you might use in your writing.

Beside above, what does idiom mean in figurative language? Definition. An idiom (also called idiomatic expression) is an expression, word, or phrase that has a figurative meaning conventionally understood by native speakers. This meaning is different from the literal meaning of the idiom's individual elements. In other words, idioms don't mean exactly what the words say.

Subsequently, one may also ask, what is idioms in literature?

An idiom is a figure of speech that means something different than a literal translation of the words would lead one to believe. Because idioms are such interesting ways to get a point across, they're often seen in literature.

What are the 10 idioms?

Here are 10 of the most common idioms that are easy to use in daily conversation:

  1. “Hit the hay.” “Sorry, guys, I have to hit the hay now!”
  2. “Up in the air”
  3. “Stabbed in the back”
  4. “Takes two to tango”
  5. “Kill two birds with one stone.”
  6. “Piece of cake”
  7. “Costs an arm and a leg”
  8. “Break a leg”

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What are the 20 idioms?

20 Common Idioms and their Meanings
  • Actions speak louder than words. What someone does means more than what they say.
  • Add insult to injury. Make a bad situation worse.
  • At the drop of a hat. Without any second thought or hesitation.
  • Bite off more than you can chew.
  • Call it a day.
  • Costs an arm and leg.
  • Driving me up the wall.
  • Fat chance.

What are common idioms?

Common English idioms & expressions
Idiom Meaning
Get a taste of your own medicine Get treated the way you've been treating others (negative)
Give someone the cold shoulder Ignore someone
Go on a wild goose chase To do something pointless
Good things come to those who wait Be patient

What are idioms 5 examples?

Body Part Idioms
  • Cross your fingers - For good luck.
  • Fell on deaf ears - People wouldn't listen to something.
  • Get cold feet - Be nervous.
  • Giving the cold shoulder - Ignore someone.
  • Have a change of heart - Changed your mind.
  • I'm all ears - You have my full attention.
  • It cost an arm and a leg - It was expensive.

What do you call someone who uses big words to sound smart?

Sesquipedalian can also be used to describe someone or something that overuses big words, like a philosophy professor or a chemistry textbook. If someone gives a sesquipedalian speech, people often assume it was smart, even if they don't really know what it was about because they can't understand the words.

Are idioms metaphors?


For most people, an idiom is an expression where the meaning is not immediately apparent from a literal interpretation of the words. A metaphor is a more extreme form of a simile. A simile is a comparison made between A and B, and a metaphor is where you say A actually is B, even though that's not literally true.

Is Break a leg an idiom?

"Break a leg" is a typical English idiom used in theatre to wish a performer "good luck". The expression probably reflects a theatrical superstition in which directly wishing a person "good luck" would be considered bad luck, therefore an alternative way of wishing luck was developed.

Is raining cats and dogs an idiom?

It's raining cats and dogs is an idiom which means it's raining extremely heavily. When streets became swollen with rain it is likely there were many dead dogs and cats floating in the flooded streets, giving the appearance of having rained cats and dogs.

What is the synonym of idiom?

Synonyms for idiom
  • dialect.
  • jargon.
  • locution.
  • parlance.
  • patois.
  • phrase.
  • vernacular.
  • argot.

Is an idiom a poetic device?

What is an Idiom? An idiom is a group of words whose meaning is figurative and different from the actual words of the expression. Idioms are used widely in everyday speech and appear in every form of written text like poetry, prose, and even scientific or business writing.

What is an example of an oxymoron?


Oxymoron is a figure of speech in which two opposite ideas are joined to create an effect. The common oxymoron phrase is a combination of an adjective proceeded by a noun with contrasting meanings, such as “cruel kindness,” or “living death”.

What is a simile example?

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind. An example of a simile is: She is as innocent as an angel. An example of a metaphor is: She is an angel.

What is an idiom in a story?

Definition of Idiom. The term idiom refers to a set expression or a phrase comprising two or more words. An interesting fact regarding the device is that the expression is not interpreted literally. The phrase is understood to mean something quite different from what individual words of the phrase would imply.

How do you explain irony?

Irony is a figure of speech in which words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words. It may also be a situation that ends up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated. In simple words, it is a difference between appearance and reality.

How do you use idiom in a sentence?

Since the woman used a strange idiom, the young kids did not understand her. When someone says "beat around the bush" to describe not addressing an issue, they are using an idiom. An idiom is not a wise choice of words for a formal speech.

What is a simile for kids?


A simile is a figure of speech that directly compares two different things. The simile is usually in a phrase that begins with the words "as" or "like." This is different from a metaphor, which is also a comparison but one says something is something else.

What makes an idiom?

An idiom is a common word or phrase which means something different from its literal meaning but can be understood because of their popular use. In order to understand an idiom, one sometimes needs to know the culture the idiom comes from.

What is an example of alliteration?

Alliteration is a term to describe a literary device in which a series of words begin with the same consonant sound. A classic example is: "She sells seashells by the sea-shore." Another fan-favorite is: "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers."