Is athlete's foot caused by a protist?

Asked By: Klaas Hilbrandt | Last Updated: 3rd May, 2020
Category: medical health foot health
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Dermatophytes are anthropophilic, meaning these parasitic fungi prefer human hosts. Athlete's foot is most commonly caused by the molds known as Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, but may also be caused by Epidermophyton floccosum.

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Similarly, it is asked, is Athlete's Foot a protist?

Most protist diseases in humans are caused by protozoa. Protozoa make humans sick when they become human parasites. Parasitic yeasts cause candidiasis, ringworm, and athlete's foot. Mold allergies are very common.

Also Know, is Athlete's Foot multicellular? Fungi can be single celled or very complex multicellular organisms. A very small number of fungi cause diseases in animals. In humans these include skin diseases such as athletes' foot, ringworm and thrush.

People also ask, what is athlete's foot caused by?

Athlete's foot occurs when the tinea fungus grows on the feet. You can catch the fungus through direct contact with an infected person, or by touching surfaces contaminated with the fungus. The fungus thrives in warm, moist environments. It's commonly found in showers, on locker room floors, and around swimming pools.

Is athlete's foot caused by bacteria?

Fungal infections of the feet are contagious and can be spread person to person or by walking on contaminated floors. Other causes of athlete's foot include contact allergy, erythrasma, bacterial infection, pompholyx, intertrigo, and occasionally psoriasis.

35 Related Question Answers Found

What kills athlete's foot instantly?

Like hydrogen peroxide, rubbing alcohol can help kill off the fungus that's on the surface level of the skin. You can apply it directly to the affected area or soak your feet in a footbath of 70 percent rubbing alcohol and 30 percent water for 30 minutes.

How long can Athlete's Foot live in shoes?

Spores persist on clothing and shoes, bedding, rugs, and furniture wherever dead skin cells are present. Toenail fungus, called onychomycosis, lurks in shoes and boots where moisture is easily trapped, and fungal spores can remain alive and active from 12 to 20 months.

Should I wear socks with athlete's foot?

The fungus that causes athlete's foot thrives in dark, damp places. Wet shoes and socks are the perfect habitat for these little critters. Your feet are safe inside shoes or socks -- as long as you keep them dry.

Does athlete's foot smell?

Fungal infections, such as athlete's foot, can also lead to bad foot odour. According to podiatrist, Lorraine Jones, feet become smelly if sweat soaks into shoes and they don't dry before you wear them again. A cheesy odour is released as the sweat decomposes.

Does Athlete's Foot eat your skin?


Athlete's foot, or tinea pedis (say: TIN-ee-uh PEH-dus), is a common skin infection that is caused by a fungus (say: FUN-guss). This fungus eats old skin cells. And plenty of them can be found on the feet!

How do you disinfect shoes from athlete's foot?

"You can take wadded up newspaper or paper towels and spray them down with Lysol and stuff them in the shoes and just leave them there overnight. That'll kill the fungus in there. It'll also kill other bacteria.

Is Athlete's Foot hereditary?

Some people are prone to athlete's foot because of a genetic predisposition or because of factors that cause a compromised immune system. Examples include steroid medications or chronic diseases such as diabetes and cancer. One of the most important factors contributing to athlete's foot is sweat.

Can I get athlete's foot on my hands?

In rare cases, athlete's foot can spread to the hands, this is known as tinea manuum. The symptoms are very similar to those experienced in the feet. People who do not wash their hands immediately after touching the affected area on their foot are at higher risk.

Is Vaseline good for athlete's foot?

Some forms of athlete's foot are so mild that there is only an extremely dry, scaly skin of the heels and soles of the feet that doesn't even itch. People try to slather on petroleum jelly and the like only for the skin to dry out less than an hour later.

Can athlete's foot grow in shoes?


The various kinds of fungi that cause athlete's foot grow best in warm places such as bathroom floors and rugs, shower stalls, near heated pools and hot tubs, plus in socks, shoes and other clothing. In fact, shoes can carry fungi for quite some time until conditions are good for growth.

Why does my athlete's foot keep coming back?

Even after proper medical treatment, the infection can return easily if your feet are exposed again to fungi and sweaty, warm conditions. For this reason, many people have athlete's foot infection that lasts or keeps returning for many years.

What does severe athlete's foot look like?

It commonly occurs between the toes. Athlete's foot looks like dry, flaky, scaly skin. The skin may also crack. Symptoms often include burning, itchy feet.

Does vinegar kill athlete's foot?

As vinegar has antifungal properties, soaking the feet daily in a vinegar foot bath could help fight off fungal infections, such as athlete's foot. However, a vinegar soak may soothe and ease symptoms and is unlikely to cause any harm. Medications are still the most effective form of treatment for athlete's foot.

Why does athlete's foot itch at night?

The natural cycling of certain hormones, molecules, and chemicals that occur in the body during the night can also cause itchiness. In some cases, the skin may only feel itchier during the night because of a lack of outside distractions. But nighttime itchiness may also be a sign of more serious health conditions.

Does Athlete's Foot Peel when healing?


It's sometimes caused by untreated athlete's foot. Early symptoms include red, painful blisters that may peel as they pop or heal.

Why does the skin between my toes split?

Cracks and fissures are breaks in your skin. They may be the result of skin that is too dry to too moist. When skin is too moist, you may get a bacterial or fungal infection. This can cause cracks between the toes.

Should you exfoliate athlete's foot?

Dead or loose skin forming on the feet is your foot's way of naturally exfoliating and shedding dead skin cells. It's usually not painful unless it's a result of athlete's foot, eczema, or another type of infection. If you suspect that's the case, see your doctor for treatment.